Dr Stephen Healy

Senior Lecturer
BSc Hons, PhD UNSW
School of Humanities & Languages

Contact

9385 1597
Room 319, Morven Brown
Kensington Campus
Fields: Research, Science and Technology Policy, Environmental Politics, Environmental Sociology, Sociology and Social Studies of Science and Technology
Tags: Government and Politics not elsewhere classified, Expanding Knowledge through Studies of Human Society, Environmental Policy, Legislation and Standards

Stephen Healy has worked for the Energy Policy Research Unit of Greenpeace International, the NSW EPA and at Middlesex University (UK) where he led the Science, Technology and Society Program. His research interests encompass: the role of science and technology in contemporary environmental problems; issues of global environmental change, particularly climate change; energy issues/politics; risk and uncertainty; public participation; consumption, and transdisciplinarity across the social/natural sciences and engineering. The formal analytical approach taken by this work ranges from the straightforward descriptive idiom, characteristic of his collaborative research with technical practitioners, through to critical, post-humanist science studies analyses. The latter, which benefit considerably from the empirical grounding provided by the former, are increasingly focused by praxeographic, post-foucauldian analyses of the dynamics of the socio-material ensembles (variously labeled ‘collectives’, ‘assemblages’, ‘agencements’ etc) that pervade and structure the contemporary world, with an emphasis upon how these constitute power (understood in Foucauldian terms).

Research

Stephen Healy, although technically trained, is a Senior Lecturer in the School of Humanities and Languages

He has worked for the Energy Policy Research Unit of Greenpeace International, the NSW EPA and at Middlesex University (UK) where he led the Science, Technology and Society Program. His research interests encompass: the role of science and technology in contemporary environmental problems; issues of global environmental change, particularly climate change; energy issues/politics; risk and uncertainty; public participation; consumption, and transdisciplinarity across the social/natural sciences and engineering.  The formal analytical approach taken by this work ranges from a descriptive idiom, commonly grounded by collaborative research with technical practitioners, through to critical, post-humanist science studies analyses.  The latter, which benefit considerably from the empirical grounding provided by the former, are increasingly focused by praxeographic, post-foucauldian analyses of the dynamics of socio-material ensembles (variously labeled ‘collectives’, ‘assemblages’, ‘agencements’ etc), which pervade and structure the contemporary world and commonly focused on the ways in which these constitute power (understood in Foucauldian terms).

Stephen is the Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences Research Coordinator for UNSW's Centre for Energy and Environmental Markets (http://www.ceem.unsw.edu.au/).


Teaching

Spans both UG and PG levels of the Environmental Humanities Program. Coordinates: a History of Technology, Consumption & Comfort - ARTS3302; Environmental Justice - ARTS3241; and Society, Environmental Policy and Sustainability - HPSC5500.

Affiliations and membership

Society for Social Studies of Science

Asia Pacific Science, Technology and Society Network

Other information

Postgraduate Supervision:

Tevita Tevunka (MElecEng): "The Sustainability of Stand-Alone Photovoltaic Lighting Systems in Tonga", awarded 2002.

James Arvanitakis (PhD):"'Hope and abundance': The Counter-Globalisation Movement as Multitude - Breaking the Logic of Pathological Modernity", awarded 2005.

Maria Retnanestri (PhD): "The I3A Framwork: Enhancing the Sustainability of Off-Grid Photovoltaic Energy Service Delivery in Indonesia", awarded 2007.

Vanessa Burns (MA): "Nonhuman Rights and Climate Change: Foundations in Early European Natural Justice", awarded 2012.

Declan Kuch (PhD): "Towards a politics of regulatory neoliberalism: a critical examination of Michel Callon’s ‘Civilising Markets’ Thesis’", awarded 2012.

Long Seng To (PhD): "Renewable Energy projects in rural China: a systemic capacity approach", awarded 2015.

Kerry Warner (PhD): Relations of Safety in Anaesthesia, 2009 –