The "Events in East Pakistan in 1971" and the Question of Genocide

When:11 May 2010, 1pm - 3pm
Venue:Morven Brown 308B
Who:

With Dirk Moses.

The "Events in East Pakistan in 1971" and the Question of Genocide.

The ‘Events in East Pakistan, 1971’, as the International Commission of Jurists titled its report on the Pakistan army’s military campaign, have often been labeled as genocide by pro-Bangladesh scholars and activists. Although the mortality and rape statistics vary widely, there is plenty of evidence of considerable violence in East Pakistan in 1971. But was it genocide? This case has not been subject to sustained empirical analysis, and is largely ignored by the literature on postwar and postcolonial genocides. This paper proposes to redress this imbalance by presenting different dimensions of the conflict, especially the role of the media and international society.

A light lunch is provided.

No bookings are necessary, and all are welcome.

Contact Details

Joanne Faulkner, j.faulkner@unsw.edu.au, 9385 2287

With Dirk Moses.

The "Events in East Pakistan in 1971" and the Question of Genocide.

The ‘Events in East Pakistan, 1971’, as the International Commission of Jurists titled its report on the Pakistan army’s military campaign, have often been labeled as genocide by pro-Bangladesh scholars and activists. Although the mortality and rape statistics vary widely, there is plenty of evidence of considerable violence in East Pakistan in 1971. But was it genocide? This case has not been subject to sustained empirical analysis, and is largely ignored by the literature on postwar and postcolonial genocides. This paper proposes to redress this imbalance by presenting different dimensions of the conflict, especially the role of the media and international society.

A light lunch is provided.

No bookings are necessary, and all are welcome.

Contact Details

Joanne Faulkner, j.faulkner@unsw.edu.au, 9385 2287

With Dirk Moses.

The "Events in East Pakistan in 1971" and the Question of Genocide.

The ‘Events in East Pakistan, 1971’, as the International Commission of Jurists titled its report on the Pakistan army’s military campaign, have often been labeled as genocide by pro-Bangladesh scholars and activists. Although the mortality and rape statistics vary widely, there is plenty of evidence of considerable violence in East Pakistan in 1971. But was it genocide? This case has not been subject to sustained empirical analysis, and is largely ignored by the literature on postwar and postcolonial genocides. This paper proposes to redress this imbalance by presenting different dimensions of the conflict, especially the role of the media and international society.

A light lunch is provided.

No bookings are necessary, and all are welcome.

Contact Details

Joanne Faulkner, j.faulkner@unsw.edu.au, 9385 2287

With Dirk Moses.

The "Events in East Pakistan in 1971" and the Question of Genocide.

The ‘Events in East Pakistan, 1971’, as the International Commission of Jurists titled its report on the Pakistan army’s military campaign, have often been labeled as genocide by pro-Bangladesh scholars and activists. Although the mortality and rape statistics vary widely, there is plenty of evidence of considerable violence in East Pakistan in 1971. But was it genocide? This case has not been subject to sustained empirical analysis, and is largely ignored by the literature on postwar and postcolonial genocides. This paper proposes to redress this imbalance by presenting different dimensions of the conflict, especially the role of the media and international society.

A light lunch is provided.

No bookings are necessary, and all are welcome.

Contact Details

Joanne Faulkner, j.faulkner@unsw.edu.au, 9385 2287

With Dirk Moses.

The "Events in East Pakistan in 1971" and the Question of Genocide.

The ‘Events in East Pakistan, 1971’, as the International Commission of Jurists titled its report on the Pakistan army’s military campaign, have often been labeled as genocide by pro-Bangladesh scholars and activists. Although the mortality and rape statistics vary widely, there is plenty of evidence of considerable violence in East Pakistan in 1971. But was it genocide? This case has not been subject to sustained empirical analysis, and is largely ignored by the literature on postwar and postcolonial genocides. This paper proposes to redress this imbalance by presenting different dimensions of the conflict, especially the role of the media and international society.

A light lunch is provided.

No bookings are necessary, and all are welcome.

Contact Details

Joanne Faulkner, j.faulkner@unsw.edu.au, 9385 2287

With Dirk Moses.

The "Events in East Pakistan in 1971" and the Question of Genocide.

The ‘Events in East Pakistan, 1971’, as the International Commission of Jurists titled its report on the Pakistan army’s military campaign, have often been labeled as genocide by pro-Bangladesh scholars and activists. Although the mortality and rape statistics vary widely, there is plenty of evidence of considerable violence in East Pakistan in 1971. But was it genocide? This case has not been subject to sustained empirical analysis, and is largely ignored by the literature on postwar and postcolonial genocides. This paper proposes to redress this imbalance by presenting different dimensions of the conflict, especially the role of the media and international society.

A light lunch is provided.

No bookings are necessary, and all are welcome.

Contact Details

Joanne Faulkner, j.faulkner@unsw.edu.au, 9385 2287

With Dirk Moses.

The "Events in East Pakistan in 1971" and the Question of Genocide.

The ‘Events in East Pakistan, 1971’, as the International Commission of Jurists titled its report on the Pakistan army’s military campaign, have often been labeled as genocide by pro-Bangladesh scholars and activists. Although the mortality and rape statistics vary widely, there is plenty of evidence of considerable violence in East Pakistan in 1971. But was it genocide? This case has not been subject to sustained empirical analysis, and is largely ignored by the literature on postwar and postcolonial genocides. This paper proposes to redress this imbalance by presenting different dimensions of the conflict, especially the role of the media and international society.

A light lunch is provided.

No bookings are necessary, and all are welcome.

Contact Details

Joanne Faulkner, j.faulkner@unsw.edu.au, 9385 2287

With Dirk Moses.

The "Events in East Pakistan in 1971" and the Question of Genocide.

The ‘Events in East Pakistan, 1971’, as the International Commission of Jurists titled its report on the Pakistan army’s military campaign, have often been labeled as genocide by pro-Bangladesh scholars and activists. Although the mortality and rape statistics vary widely, there is plenty of evidence of considerable violence in East Pakistan in 1971. But was it genocide? This case has not been subject to sustained empirical analysis, and is largely ignored by the literature on postwar and postcolonial genocides. This paper proposes to redress this imbalance by presenting different dimensions of the conflict, especially the role of the media and international society.

A light lunch is provided.

No bookings are necessary, and all are welcome.

Contact Details

Joanne Faulkner, j.faulkner@unsw.edu.au, 9385 2287

With Dirk Moses.

The "Events in East Pakistan in 1971" and the Question of Genocide.

The ‘Events in East Pakistan, 1971’, as the International Commission of Jurists titled its report on the Pakistan army’s military campaign, have often been labeled as genocide by pro-Bangladesh scholars and activists. Although the mortality and rape statistics vary widely, there is plenty of evidence of considerable violence in East Pakistan in 1971. But was it genocide? This case has not been subject to sustained empirical analysis, and is largely ignored by the literature on postwar and postcolonial genocides. This paper proposes to redress this imbalance by presenting different dimensions of the conflict, especially the role of the media and international society.

A light lunch is provided.

No bookings are necessary, and all are welcome.

Contact Details

Joanne Faulkner, j.faulkner@unsw.edu.au, 9385 2287

With Dirk Moses.

The "Events in East Pakistan in 1971" and the Question of Genocide.

The ‘Events in East Pakistan, 1971’, as the International Commission of Jurists titled its report on the Pakistan army’s military campaign, have often been labeled as genocide by pro-Bangladesh scholars and activists. Although the mortality and rape statistics vary widely, there is plenty of evidence of considerable violence in East Pakistan in 1971. But was it genocide? This case has not been subject to sustained empirical analysis, and is largely ignored by the literature on postwar and postcolonial genocides. This paper proposes to redress this imbalance by presenting different dimensions of the conflict, especially the role of the media and international society.

A light lunch is provided.

No bookings are necessary, and all are welcome.

Contact Details

Joanne Faulkner, j.faulkner@unsw.edu.au, 9385 2287

With Dirk Moses.

The "Events in East Pakistan in 1971" and the Question of Genocide.

The ‘Events in East Pakistan, 1971’, as the International Commission of Jurists titled its report on the Pakistan army’s military campaign, have often been labeled as genocide by pro-Bangladesh scholars and activists. Although the mortality and rape statistics vary widely, there is plenty of evidence of considerable violence in East Pakistan in 1971. But was it genocide? This case has not been subject to sustained empirical analysis, and is largely ignored by the literature on postwar and postcolonial genocides. This paper proposes to redress this imbalance by presenting different dimensions of the conflict, especially the role of the media and international society.

A light lunch is provided.

No bookings are necessary, and all are welcome.

Contact Details

Joanne Faulkner, j.faulkner@unsw.edu.au, 9385 2287

With Dirk Moses.

The "Events in East Pakistan in 1971" and the Question of Genocide.

The ‘Events in East Pakistan, 1971’, as the International Commission of Jurists titled its report on the Pakistan army’s military campaign, have often been labeled as genocide by pro-Bangladesh scholars and activists. Although the mortality and rape statistics vary widely, there is plenty of evidence of considerable violence in East Pakistan in 1971. But was it genocide? This case has not been subject to sustained empirical analysis, and is largely ignored by the literature on postwar and postcolonial genocides. This paper proposes to redress this imbalance by presenting different dimensions of the conflict, especially the role of the media and international society.

A light lunch is provided.

No bookings are necessary, and all are welcome.

Contact Details

Joanne Faulkner, j.faulkner@unsw.edu.au, 9385 2287

With Dirk Moses.

The "Events in East Pakistan in 1971" and the Question of Genocide.

The ‘Events in East Pakistan, 1971’, as the International Commission of Jurists titled its report on the Pakistan army’s military campaign, have often been labeled as genocide by pro-Bangladesh scholars and activists. Although the mortality and rape statistics vary widely, there is plenty of evidence of considerable violence in East Pakistan in 1971. But was it genocide? This case has not been subject to sustained empirical analysis, and is largely ignored by the literature on postwar and postcolonial genocides. This paper proposes to redress this imbalance by presenting different dimensions of the conflict, especially the role of the media and international society.

A light lunch is provided.

No bookings are necessary, and all are welcome.

Contact Details

Joanne Faulkner, j.faulkner@unsw.edu.au, 9385 2287

With Dirk Moses.

The "Events in East Pakistan in 1971" and the Question of Genocide.

The ‘Events in East Pakistan, 1971’, as the International Commission of Jurists titled its report on the Pakistan army’s military campaign, have often been labeled as genocide by pro-Bangladesh scholars and activists. Although the mortality and rape statistics vary widely, there is plenty of evidence of considerable violence in East Pakistan in 1971. But was it genocide? This case has not been subject to sustained empirical analysis, and is largely ignored by the literature on postwar and postcolonial genocides. This paper proposes to redress this imbalance by presenting different dimensions of the conflict, especially the role of the media and international society.

A light lunch is provided.

No bookings are necessary, and all are welcome.

Contact Details

Joanne Faulkner, j.faulkner@unsw.edu.au, 9385 2287

With Dirk Moses.

The "Events in East Pakistan in 1971" and the Question of Genocide.

The ‘Events in East Pakistan, 1971’, as the International Commission of Jurists titled its report on the Pakistan army’s military campaign, have often been labeled as genocide by pro-Bangladesh scholars and activists. Although the mortality and rape statistics vary widely, there is plenty of evidence of considerable violence in East Pakistan in 1971. But was it genocide? This case has not been subject to sustained empirical analysis, and is largely ignored by the literature on postwar and postcolonial genocides. This paper proposes to redress this imbalance by presenting different dimensions of the conflict, especially the role of the media and international society.

A light lunch is provided.

No bookings are necessary, and all are welcome.

Contact Details

Joanne Faulkner, j.faulkner@unsw.edu.au, 9385 2287

With Dirk Moses.

The "Events in East Pakistan in 1971" and the Question of Genocide.

The ‘Events in East Pakistan, 1971’, as the International Commission of Jurists titled its report on the Pakistan army’s military campaign, have often been labeled as genocide by pro-Bangladesh scholars and activists. Although the mortality and rape statistics vary widely, there is plenty of evidence of considerable violence in East Pakistan in 1971. But was it genocide? This case has not been subject to sustained empirical analysis, and is largely ignored by the literature on postwar and postcolonial genocides. This paper proposes to redress this imbalance by presenting different dimensions of the conflict, especially the role of the media and international society.

A light lunch is provided.

No bookings are necessary, and all are welcome.

Contact Details

Joanne Faulkner, j.faulkner@unsw.edu.au, 9385 2287

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