The Politics of Wounds: The Social and Economic Value of Body Parts

When:2 Mar 2010, 1pm - 3pm
Venue:Morven Brown 308B
Who:

Ana Carden-Coyne
(University of Manchester)

The Politics of Wounds: The Social and Economic Value of Body Parts

This paper forms part of a final chapter in my book The Politics of Wounds - where I draw together the past (the First World War) and the present day in the UK and US, using diaries, pension files and state archives, charity reports and fund-raising material, military medical data, media reporting and imagery, and interviews with wounded soldiers and families. This interdisciplinary paper draws on history, anthropology and disability theory in order to explore the social, economic, personal, and political values attached to physical wounds. However, it will also touch on the psychological and psychosocial aspects of physical wounds in order to highlight the problem of a body conceptualised by the state, military medicine and the prosthetics industry as a compilation of parts.

Ana Carden-Coyne teaches at the Centre for the Cultural History of War, University of Manchester. Her books include Reconstructing the Body: Classicism, Modernism and the First World War (Oxford, 2009), and Cultures of the Abdomen Diet, Digestion, and Fat in the Modern World (ed.) (Palgrave Macmillan, 2005). Her current project explores "Men in Pain: Disability, Rehabilitation and Masculinity in War."

Contact Details

Joanne Faulkner, j.faulkner@unsw.edu.au, 9385 2287

Ana Carden-Coyne
(University of Manchester)

The Politics of Wounds: The Social and Economic Value of Body Parts

This paper forms part of a final chapter in my book The Politics of Wounds - where I draw together the past (the First World War) and the present day in the UK and US, using diaries, pension files and state archives, charity reports and fund-raising material, military medical data, media reporting and imagery, and interviews with wounded soldiers and families. This interdisciplinary paper draws on history, anthropology and disability theory in order to explore the social, economic, personal, and political values attached to physical wounds. However, it will also touch on the psychological and psychosocial aspects of physical wounds in order to highlight the problem of a body conceptualised by the state, military medicine and the prosthetics industry as a compilation of parts.

Ana Carden-Coyne teaches at the Centre for the Cultural History of War, University of Manchester. Her books include Reconstructing the Body: Classicism, Modernism and the First World War (Oxford, 2009), and Cultures of the Abdomen Diet, Digestion, and Fat in the Modern World (ed.) (Palgrave Macmillan, 2005). Her current project explores "Men in Pain: Disability, Rehabilitation and Masculinity in War."

Contact Details

Joanne Faulkner, j.faulkner@unsw.edu.au, 9385 2287

Ana Carden-Coyne
(University of Manchester)

The Politics of Wounds: The Social and Economic Value of Body Parts

This paper forms part of a final chapter in my book The Politics of Wounds - where I draw together the past (the First World War) and the present day in the UK and US, using diaries, pension files and state archives, charity reports and fund-raising material, military medical data, media reporting and imagery, and interviews with wounded soldiers and families. This interdisciplinary paper draws on history, anthropology and disability theory in order to explore the social, economic, personal, and political values attached to physical wounds. However, it will also touch on the psychological and psychosocial aspects of physical wounds in order to highlight the problem of a body conceptualised by the state, military medicine and the prosthetics industry as a compilation of parts.

Ana Carden-Coyne teaches at the Centre for the Cultural History of War, University of Manchester. Her books include Reconstructing the Body: Classicism, Modernism and the First World War (Oxford, 2009), and Cultures of the Abdomen Diet, Digestion, and Fat in the Modern World (ed.) (Palgrave Macmillan, 2005). Her current project explores "Men in Pain: Disability, Rehabilitation and Masculinity in War."

Contact Details

Joanne Faulkner, j.faulkner@unsw.edu.au, 9385 2287

Ana Carden-Coyne
(University of Manchester)

The Politics of Wounds: The Social and Economic Value of Body Parts

This paper forms part of a final chapter in my book The Politics of Wounds - where I draw together the past (the First World War) and the present day in the UK and US, using diaries, pension files and state archives, charity reports and fund-raising material, military medical data, media reporting and imagery, and interviews with wounded soldiers and families. This interdisciplinary paper draws on history, anthropology and disability theory in order to explore the social, economic, personal, and political values attached to physical wounds. However, it will also touch on the psychological and psychosocial aspects of physical wounds in order to highlight the problem of a body conceptualised by the state, military medicine and the prosthetics industry as a compilation of parts.

Ana Carden-Coyne teaches at the Centre for the Cultural History of War, University of Manchester. Her books include Reconstructing the Body: Classicism, Modernism and the First World War (Oxford, 2009), and Cultures of the Abdomen Diet, Digestion, and Fat in the Modern World (ed.) (Palgrave Macmillan, 2005). Her current project explores "Men in Pain: Disability, Rehabilitation and Masculinity in War."

Contact Details

Joanne Faulkner, j.faulkner@unsw.edu.au, 9385 2287

Ana Carden-Coyne
(University of Manchester)

The Politics of Wounds: The Social and Economic Value of Body Parts

This paper forms part of a final chapter in my book The Politics of Wounds - where I draw together the past (the First World War) and the present day in the UK and US, using diaries, pension files and state archives, charity reports and fund-raising material, military medical data, media reporting and imagery, and interviews with wounded soldiers and families. This interdisciplinary paper draws on history, anthropology and disability theory in order to explore the social, economic, personal, and political values attached to physical wounds. However, it will also touch on the psychological and psychosocial aspects of physical wounds in order to highlight the problem of a body conceptualised by the state, military medicine and the prosthetics industry as a compilation of parts.

Ana Carden-Coyne teaches at the Centre for the Cultural History of War, University of Manchester. Her books include Reconstructing the Body: Classicism, Modernism and the First World War (Oxford, 2009), and Cultures of the Abdomen Diet, Digestion, and Fat in the Modern World (ed.) (Palgrave Macmillan, 2005). Her current project explores "Men in Pain: Disability, Rehabilitation and Masculinity in War."

Contact Details

Joanne Faulkner, j.faulkner@unsw.edu.au, 9385 2287

Ana Carden-Coyne
(University of Manchester)

The Politics of Wounds: The Social and Economic Value of Body Parts

This paper forms part of a final chapter in my book The Politics of Wounds - where I draw together the past (the First World War) and the present day in the UK and US, using diaries, pension files and state archives, charity reports and fund-raising material, military medical data, media reporting and imagery, and interviews with wounded soldiers and families. This interdisciplinary paper draws on history, anthropology and disability theory in order to explore the social, economic, personal, and political values attached to physical wounds. However, it will also touch on the psychological and psychosocial aspects of physical wounds in order to highlight the problem of a body conceptualised by the state, military medicine and the prosthetics industry as a compilation of parts.

Ana Carden-Coyne teaches at the Centre for the Cultural History of War, University of Manchester. Her books include Reconstructing the Body: Classicism, Modernism and the First World War (Oxford, 2009), and Cultures of the Abdomen Diet, Digestion, and Fat in the Modern World (ed.) (Palgrave Macmillan, 2005). Her current project explores "Men in Pain: Disability, Rehabilitation and Masculinity in War."

Contact Details

Joanne Faulkner, j.faulkner@unsw.edu.au, 9385 2287

Ana Carden-Coyne
(University of Manchester)

The Politics of Wounds: The Social and Economic Value of Body Parts

This paper forms part of a final chapter in my book The Politics of Wounds - where I draw together the past (the First World War) and the present day in the UK and US, using diaries, pension files and state archives, charity reports and fund-raising material, military medical data, media reporting and imagery, and interviews with wounded soldiers and families. This interdisciplinary paper draws on history, anthropology and disability theory in order to explore the social, economic, personal, and political values attached to physical wounds. However, it will also touch on the psychological and psychosocial aspects of physical wounds in order to highlight the problem of a body conceptualised by the state, military medicine and the prosthetics industry as a compilation of parts.

Ana Carden-Coyne teaches at the Centre for the Cultural History of War, University of Manchester. Her books include Reconstructing the Body: Classicism, Modernism and the First World War (Oxford, 2009), and Cultures of the Abdomen Diet, Digestion, and Fat in the Modern World (ed.) (Palgrave Macmillan, 2005). Her current project explores "Men in Pain: Disability, Rehabilitation and Masculinity in War."

Contact Details

Joanne Faulkner, j.faulkner@unsw.edu.au, 9385 2287

Ana Carden-Coyne
(University of Manchester)

The Politics of Wounds: The Social and Economic Value of Body Parts

This paper forms part of a final chapter in my book The Politics of Wounds - where I draw together the past (the First World War) and the present day in the UK and US, using diaries, pension files and state archives, charity reports and fund-raising material, military medical data, media reporting and imagery, and interviews with wounded soldiers and families. This interdisciplinary paper draws on history, anthropology and disability theory in order to explore the social, economic, personal, and political values attached to physical wounds. However, it will also touch on the psychological and psychosocial aspects of physical wounds in order to highlight the problem of a body conceptualised by the state, military medicine and the prosthetics industry as a compilation of parts.

Ana Carden-Coyne teaches at the Centre for the Cultural History of War, University of Manchester. Her books include Reconstructing the Body: Classicism, Modernism and the First World War (Oxford, 2009), and Cultures of the Abdomen Diet, Digestion, and Fat in the Modern World (ed.) (Palgrave Macmillan, 2005). Her current project explores "Men in Pain: Disability, Rehabilitation and Masculinity in War."

Contact Details

Joanne Faulkner, j.faulkner@unsw.edu.au, 9385 2287

Ana Carden-Coyne
(University of Manchester)

The Politics of Wounds: The Social and Economic Value of Body Parts

This paper forms part of a final chapter in my book The Politics of Wounds - where I draw together the past (the First World War) and the present day in the UK and US, using diaries, pension files and state archives, charity reports and fund-raising material, military medical data, media reporting and imagery, and interviews with wounded soldiers and families. This interdisciplinary paper draws on history, anthropology and disability theory in order to explore the social, economic, personal, and political values attached to physical wounds. However, it will also touch on the psychological and psychosocial aspects of physical wounds in order to highlight the problem of a body conceptualised by the state, military medicine and the prosthetics industry as a compilation of parts.

Ana Carden-Coyne teaches at the Centre for the Cultural History of War, University of Manchester. Her books include Reconstructing the Body: Classicism, Modernism and the First World War (Oxford, 2009), and Cultures of the Abdomen Diet, Digestion, and Fat in the Modern World (ed.) (Palgrave Macmillan, 2005). Her current project explores "Men in Pain: Disability, Rehabilitation and Masculinity in War."

Contact Details

Joanne Faulkner, j.faulkner@unsw.edu.au, 9385 2287

Ana Carden-Coyne
(University of Manchester)

The Politics of Wounds: The Social and Economic Value of Body Parts

This paper forms part of a final chapter in my book The Politics of Wounds - where I draw together the past (the First World War) and the present day in the UK and US, using diaries, pension files and state archives, charity reports and fund-raising material, military medical data, media reporting and imagery, and interviews with wounded soldiers and families. This interdisciplinary paper draws on history, anthropology and disability theory in order to explore the social, economic, personal, and political values attached to physical wounds. However, it will also touch on the psychological and psychosocial aspects of physical wounds in order to highlight the problem of a body conceptualised by the state, military medicine and the prosthetics industry as a compilation of parts.

Ana Carden-Coyne teaches at the Centre for the Cultural History of War, University of Manchester. Her books include Reconstructing the Body: Classicism, Modernism and the First World War (Oxford, 2009), and Cultures of the Abdomen Diet, Digestion, and Fat in the Modern World (ed.) (Palgrave Macmillan, 2005). Her current project explores "Men in Pain: Disability, Rehabilitation and Masculinity in War."

Contact Details

Joanne Faulkner, j.faulkner@unsw.edu.au, 9385 2287

Ana Carden-Coyne
(University of Manchester)

The Politics of Wounds: The Social and Economic Value of Body Parts

This paper forms part of a final chapter in my book The Politics of Wounds - where I draw together the past (the First World War) and the present day in the UK and US, using diaries, pension files and state archives, charity reports and fund-raising material, military medical data, media reporting and imagery, and interviews with wounded soldiers and families. This interdisciplinary paper draws on history, anthropology and disability theory in order to explore the social, economic, personal, and political values attached to physical wounds. However, it will also touch on the psychological and psychosocial aspects of physical wounds in order to highlight the problem of a body conceptualised by the state, military medicine and the prosthetics industry as a compilation of parts.

Ana Carden-Coyne teaches at the Centre for the Cultural History of War, University of Manchester. Her books include Reconstructing the Body: Classicism, Modernism and the First World War (Oxford, 2009), and Cultures of the Abdomen Diet, Digestion, and Fat in the Modern World (ed.) (Palgrave Macmillan, 2005). Her current project explores "Men in Pain: Disability, Rehabilitation and Masculinity in War."

Contact Details

Joanne Faulkner, j.faulkner@unsw.edu.au, 9385 2287

Ana Carden-Coyne
(University of Manchester)

The Politics of Wounds: The Social and Economic Value of Body Parts

This paper forms part of a final chapter in my book The Politics of Wounds - where I draw together the past (the First World War) and the present day in the UK and US, using diaries, pension files and state archives, charity reports and fund-raising material, military medical data, media reporting and imagery, and interviews with wounded soldiers and families. This interdisciplinary paper draws on history, anthropology and disability theory in order to explore the social, economic, personal, and political values attached to physical wounds. However, it will also touch on the psychological and psychosocial aspects of physical wounds in order to highlight the problem of a body conceptualised by the state, military medicine and the prosthetics industry as a compilation of parts.

Ana Carden-Coyne teaches at the Centre for the Cultural History of War, University of Manchester. Her books include Reconstructing the Body: Classicism, Modernism and the First World War (Oxford, 2009), and Cultures of the Abdomen Diet, Digestion, and Fat in the Modern World (ed.) (Palgrave Macmillan, 2005). Her current project explores "Men in Pain: Disability, Rehabilitation and Masculinity in War."

Contact Details

Joanne Faulkner, j.faulkner@unsw.edu.au, 9385 2287

Ana Carden-Coyne
(University of Manchester)

The Politics of Wounds: The Social and Economic Value of Body Parts

This paper forms part of a final chapter in my book The Politics of Wounds - where I draw together the past (the First World War) and the present day in the UK and US, using diaries, pension files and state archives, charity reports and fund-raising material, military medical data, media reporting and imagery, and interviews with wounded soldiers and families. This interdisciplinary paper draws on history, anthropology and disability theory in order to explore the social, economic, personal, and political values attached to physical wounds. However, it will also touch on the psychological and psychosocial aspects of physical wounds in order to highlight the problem of a body conceptualised by the state, military medicine and the prosthetics industry as a compilation of parts.

Ana Carden-Coyne teaches at the Centre for the Cultural History of War, University of Manchester. Her books include Reconstructing the Body: Classicism, Modernism and the First World War (Oxford, 2009), and Cultures of the Abdomen Diet, Digestion, and Fat in the Modern World (ed.) (Palgrave Macmillan, 2005). Her current project explores "Men in Pain: Disability, Rehabilitation and Masculinity in War."

Contact Details

Joanne Faulkner, j.faulkner@unsw.edu.au, 9385 2287

Ana Carden-Coyne
(University of Manchester)

The Politics of Wounds: The Social and Economic Value of Body Parts

This paper forms part of a final chapter in my book The Politics of Wounds - where I draw together the past (the First World War) and the present day in the UK and US, using diaries, pension files and state archives, charity reports and fund-raising material, military medical data, media reporting and imagery, and interviews with wounded soldiers and families. This interdisciplinary paper draws on history, anthropology and disability theory in order to explore the social, economic, personal, and political values attached to physical wounds. However, it will also touch on the psychological and psychosocial aspects of physical wounds in order to highlight the problem of a body conceptualised by the state, military medicine and the prosthetics industry as a compilation of parts.

Ana Carden-Coyne teaches at the Centre for the Cultural History of War, University of Manchester. Her books include Reconstructing the Body: Classicism, Modernism and the First World War (Oxford, 2009), and Cultures of the Abdomen Diet, Digestion, and Fat in the Modern World (ed.) (Palgrave Macmillan, 2005). Her current project explores "Men in Pain: Disability, Rehabilitation and Masculinity in War."

Contact Details

Joanne Faulkner, j.faulkner@unsw.edu.au, 9385 2287

Ana Carden-Coyne
(University of Manchester)

The Politics of Wounds: The Social and Economic Value of Body Parts

This paper forms part of a final chapter in my book The Politics of Wounds - where I draw together the past (the First World War) and the present day in the UK and US, using diaries, pension files and state archives, charity reports and fund-raising material, military medical data, media reporting and imagery, and interviews with wounded soldiers and families. This interdisciplinary paper draws on history, anthropology and disability theory in order to explore the social, economic, personal, and political values attached to physical wounds. However, it will also touch on the psychological and psychosocial aspects of physical wounds in order to highlight the problem of a body conceptualised by the state, military medicine and the prosthetics industry as a compilation of parts.

Ana Carden-Coyne teaches at the Centre for the Cultural History of War, University of Manchester. Her books include Reconstructing the Body: Classicism, Modernism and the First World War (Oxford, 2009), and Cultures of the Abdomen Diet, Digestion, and Fat in the Modern World (ed.) (Palgrave Macmillan, 2005). Her current project explores "Men in Pain: Disability, Rehabilitation and Masculinity in War."

Contact Details

Joanne Faulkner, j.faulkner@unsw.edu.au, 9385 2287

Ana Carden-Coyne
(University of Manchester)

The Politics of Wounds: The Social and Economic Value of Body Parts

This paper forms part of a final chapter in my book The Politics of Wounds - where I draw together the past (the First World War) and the present day in the UK and US, using diaries, pension files and state archives, charity reports and fund-raising material, military medical data, media reporting and imagery, and interviews with wounded soldiers and families. This interdisciplinary paper draws on history, anthropology and disability theory in order to explore the social, economic, personal, and political values attached to physical wounds. However, it will also touch on the psychological and psychosocial aspects of physical wounds in order to highlight the problem of a body conceptualised by the state, military medicine and the prosthetics industry as a compilation of parts.

Ana Carden-Coyne teaches at the Centre for the Cultural History of War, University of Manchester. Her books include Reconstructing the Body: Classicism, Modernism and the First World War (Oxford, 2009), and Cultures of the Abdomen Diet, Digestion, and Fat in the Modern World (ed.) (Palgrave Macmillan, 2005). Her current project explores "Men in Pain: Disability, Rehabilitation and Masculinity in War."

Contact Details

Joanne Faulkner, j.faulkner@unsw.edu.au, 9385 2287

Ana Carden-Coyne
(University of Manchester)

The Politics of Wounds: The Social and Economic Value of Body Parts

This paper forms part of a final chapter in my book The Politics of Wounds - where I draw together the past (the First World War) and the present day in the UK and US, using diaries, pension files and state archives, charity reports and fund-raising material, military medical data, media reporting and imagery, and interviews with wounded soldiers and families. This interdisciplinary paper draws on history, anthropology and disability theory in order to explore the social, economic, personal, and political values attached to physical wounds. However, it will also touch on the psychological and psychosocial aspects of physical wounds in order to highlight the problem of a body conceptualised by the state, military medicine and the prosthetics industry as a compilation of parts.

Ana Carden-Coyne teaches at the Centre for the Cultural History of War, University of Manchester. Her books include Reconstructing the Body: Classicism, Modernism and the First World War (Oxford, 2009), and Cultures of the Abdomen Diet, Digestion, and Fat in the Modern World (ed.) (Palgrave Macmillan, 2005). Her current project explores "Men in Pain: Disability, Rehabilitation and Masculinity in War."

Contact Details

Joanne Faulkner, j.faulkner@unsw.edu.au, 9385 2287

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