Dr Nicolas Rasmussen awarded the prestigious Jackson Prize

24 Aug 2008

Dr. Nicolas Rasmussen of the School of History & Philosophy, is the winner of the fifth annual Stanley Jackson award for the best paper in the Journal of the History of Medicine and Allied Science. The journal paper is titled ‘Making the First Anti-Depressant: Amphetamine in American Medicine, 1929-1950’ (JHMAS July 2006, vol.61, no.3). The same paper won the 2007 J.Worth Estes Prize of the American Association for the History of Medicine, for best scholarly work on the history of pharmacology and pharmaceuticals, earlier this year.

Dr. Rasmussen’s research concerns the history of drug development, particularly the links between academic life science and the pharmaceutical industry before the molecular genetics revolution. His book about the development of biological electron microscopy, Picture Control (Stanford University Press, 1997) won the 1999 Paul Bunge Prize for best work on the history of scientific instrumentation, given by German Chemical Society, and the 2000 Book Prize of the History of Science Society's Forum for History of Science in America.

The Jackson Prize was created in the honor of Dr. Stanley W. Jackson (1920-2000). Dr. Jackson was a former editor of the journal, president of the American Association for the History of Medicine, and a distinguished professor of psychiatry and medical history at Yale Medical School. He was the author of numerous works in the history of medicine, including Care of the Psyche: A History of Psychological Healing (1999).

The Jackson Prize is given for a paper published in the Journal of the History of Medicine and Allied Sciences, selected by a committee appointed by the editor.